Directional valves are widely used in fluid control applications. The simplest directional valve, both functionally and conceptually, is the check valve. Valves of this type are designed to allow flow in one direction while blocking it in the other direction. Some types of check valves, such as the pilot-operated check valves, are more complex, but the most commonly used valve in fluid power systems is the inline check valve. This blog will discuss what inline check valves are and when they should be used.


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For fixed-wing aircraft, flight control surfaces allow for pilots to manipulate attitude for more optimal adjustments to direction and heading. Located on the tail-end of the fuselage, the rudder is a primary flight control surface that is often overlooked for its importance. As a section of the vertical stabilizer, the rudder allows for the adjustment of yaw during flight operations.


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Ailerons and elevators are a type of flight control surface, allowing for pilots to better govern the aircraft and the aerodynamic forces they are subjected to. From increasing the ability of lift to adjusting the direction of the aircraft, ailerons and elevators are crucial for a number of aircraft operations, thus increasing efficiency and safety across the board. In this blog, we will discuss what each control surface is, as well as how they benefit a number of aircraft with their capabilities.


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From the automotive industry to infrastructure, a great amount of construction utilizes welding for bonding together metals and components. Despite this, many may have noticed that most commercial aircraft utilize riveting and other fastener components in order to assemble structures. Although welding is a longstanding practice that has been well developed over the past centuries, the aviation industry steadily chooses rivets due to their reliability and ease of maintenance that leads to safer aircraft. In this blog, we will discuss why aircraft are constructed with the use of rivets, and why riveting is so important for safety.


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While it is not common for thrust bearings to fail, their failure can result in catastrophe for an engine. In addition to being a costly and arduous repair effort, thrust bearing failure poses a marked safety threat to operators in the surrounding area. In an engine block, crankshaft thrust bearings are placed into grooves formed by the engine block webbing. The purpose of thrust bearings is to limit the crankshaft’s forward and backward motion by keeping the crankshaft within a set range of motion. By doing this, tolerance within the entire rotating assembly is preserved, maintaining the entire engine’s lifespan.


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